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Flame and fire: A heated history of the Olympic's most powerful symbol
Tyler Rix lights the Olympic cauldron during the London 2012 Olympic Torch Relay Finale Concert in London's Hyde Park.
July 27th, 2012
12:53 PM ET

Flame and fire: A heated history of the Olympic's most powerful symbol

By Tommy Andres, CNN

(CNN) – The lighting of the Olympic cauldron is the culmination of years of planning and millions of dollars spent by the host country.

It is the zenith of the Opening Ceremony, when flame turns to fire. But it wasn’t always such a big deal, according to Jaime Loucky, author of The Complete Book of the Olympics.

[3:18] “The first person who lit it was just some unnamed employee of the electric utility company. It hadn’t become a pageant, it hadn’t become a big thing so they just had some random guy light it.”

FULL POST

Fringe Festival: DIY art for these shaky times
A scene from the show, "A Day In the Life of Miss Hiccup," at the 2012 Capital Fringe Festival in Washington DC
July 27th, 2012
10:32 AM ET

Fringe Festival: DIY art for these shaky times

By Libby Lewis, CNN

(CNN) – After World War II, Edinburgh, Scotland created a theater festival for the war-weary – and they invited the biggest names in theater.

But they didn't invite the locals who wanted to put on their shows, too. So the locals put them on anyway, in alleyways, in bars, in churches, anywhere they could.

And so the Fringe Festival phenomenon was born. Over the past decade, Fringe has spread in the States. From Boulder to Orlando, New York, Cincinnati, and Minneapolis, and other cities.

Fringe is art for these shaky economic times. It's free-wheeling, low-tech, and especially, unjuried. The Fringe philosophy says: if you have a play to put on, Fringe will give you a stage and the basics. Let the market decide whether you're any good! FULL POST

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