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Race divide after Obama
Barack Obama supporters in Birmingham, Alabama celebrate as his win of the US presidential election is announced November 4, 2008.
November 5th, 2012
07:38 PM ET

Race divide after Obama

By Pat St. Claire, CNN

(CNN) - When Barack Obama became the first black president of the United States there was a hope that his election would usher in a sea change; an almost magical transformation of race relations. But nearly four years later that has not happened. In fact, according to surveys designed by the Associated Press and several leading universities, racial attitudes have not improved during the Obama presidency. They have worsened.

Deidre Okonkwo knows all about the racial divide. She's a tall, slim woman with a welcoming smile who lives in a decidedly conservative, mostly Republican suburb of Atlanta with her husband and three children. Okonkwo is white and her husband, the sculptor, Nnamdi Okonkwo,  is Nigerian.

[:22] "I'm from the west, Idaho, and I can see the racial tensions. There is a reason why blacks should feel the way they do because of what they went through. And we don't understand that and we never will. But, we have to first realize that there is something there." FULL POST

CNN Radio News Day: November 5, 2012
Bruce Springsteen performing at a campaign rally event for President Obama in Wisconsin.
November 5th, 2012
04:30 PM ET

CNN Radio News Day: November 5, 2012

CNN Radio News Day is an evening news program providing an informative, thoughtful and creative look at the day's events. It's posted Monday through Friday at 4:30 pm ET.

You don’t have to be at this blog to listen, we want you to take us with you! Click the download button in the SoundCloud player and put us on your smart phone or tablet and bring us with you in the car, on the train or while you’re working out.

(CNN) – Welcome to CNN Radio News Day.

Here are some of the stories we cover in today's edition:

  • When Barack Obama became the first black president there was a hope, an aspiration, that his election would usher in a sea change – an almost magical transformation of race relations in the United States.  According to scientific surveys designed by researchers at several leading universities and the Associated Press, that hasn't happened:

“Progress is usually not linear with respect to racial reconciliation. You'll have these monumental moments of change and then sometimes you'll have retrenchment and then we lurch forward", says Emory University political science professor, Andra Gillespie.

FULL POST

On Rockaway Beach, the troops have landed
Marines set up a water pump to clear out the basement of an apartment complex in Far Rockaway, New York, Nov. 4, 2012.
November 5th, 2012
03:38 PM ET

On Rockaway Beach, the troops have landed

By Libby Lewis, CNN

(CNN) - Federal troops are now directly involved in Hurricane Sandy operations – along with state National Guardsmen and local police and emergency responders.

The military has long been the backup for local and state responders in major disasters. What’s changed over time is who’s in charge.

For those Marines helping out in Rockaway Beach and Staten Island, the answer is: New York’s Governor, Andrew Cuomo. FULL POST

‘Three strikes’ law on ballot in California
California voters will decide Tuesday if the state’s three strikes law is too tough.
November 5th, 2012
02:49 PM ET

‘Three strikes’ law on ballot in California

By Jim Roope, CNN

(CNN) – One of the more complicated decisions California voters face election day is whether that state’s 'three strikes' law is too tough, or not enough.

[:20] "The three strikes law is a very powerful tool to go after recidivists; violent serious criminals; one that we have to retain."

Los Angeles's tough-on-crime District Attorney Steve Cooley says the 'three strikes' law works, but it is a bit too tough.

[:38] “It has to be used I think, not on individuals who have the prior criminal history that commit non-violent, non-serious such as petty theft with a prior, a two-bit forgery, you know, c'mon, a simple possession of drugs. Not 25-to-life."

FULL POST

What it takes to be a teen politician
Nineteen-year-old Aziz Akbari is interviewed by a local television reporter.
November 5th, 2012
10:47 AM ET

What it takes to be a teen politician

By Tommy Andres, CNN

(CNN) – Most 18-year-olds are excited for election Tuesday because it will be their first chance to vote. Aziz Akbari is excited for a different reason: his name is on a ballot.

Akbari is a sophomore at the University of Southern California studying mechanical engineering, and this year he’s thrown his hat in the ring for mayor of his hometown of Fremont, California.

[:59] “I’ve been going to city council meetings since I was 8 years old,” Akbari says. “And I’ve been involved in local politics ever since then.”

Akbari campaigns from his dorm room all week with the help of his campaign staff, and flies home every weekend to go door-to-door, press the flesh, and push his four-point plan to boost Fremont’s economy.

FULL POST

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