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CNN Radio News Day: April 5, 2013
A package of Plan B contraceptive is displayed on April 5, 2013.
April 5th, 2013
04:29 PM ET

CNN Radio News Day: April 5, 2013

CNN Radio News Day is an evening news program providing an informative, thoughtful and creative look at the day's events. It's posted Monday through Friday at 4:30 pm ET.

You don’t have to be at this blog to listen, we want you to take us with you! Click the download button in the SoundCloud player and put us on your smart phone or tablet and bring us with you in the car, on the train or while you’re working out.

(CNN) – Welcome to CNN Radio News Day.

  • Only about half as many jobs as expected were added to the economy last month. Hiring fell sharply in March, with just 88,000 jobs created. That's the lowest monthly increase since June of 2012.  Many economists were expecting an increase of 190,000.  The Labor Department says the unemployment rate did inch down to 7.6%, its lowest rate since 2008,  but that's not good news because nearly 500,000 people simply quit looking for a job. CNN's Ali Velshi explains it's a damper on the economy:

"The jobs market, it's been growing for 36 or 37 straight months, but it is not growing at the speed we need it to and that is holding the economic growth back in this country."

FULL POST

CNN Profiles: The man who makes us face fear
April 5th, 2013
11:29 AM ET

CNN Profiles: The man who makes us face fear

Hosted by Michael Schulder

Follow Michael at: www.wavemaker.me

Editor's Note: Listen to the full interview in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) – When people hear the name of our guest on this CNN Profiles they may imagine he will look like Charles Manson.

You'll know why when we introduce him.

But we have decided to keep his identity a bit mysterious until he tells you a bit of his unusual upbringing.

Let's just say this man was not groomed for Hollywood. And yet, that is where he made his fame and fortune. FULL POST

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Filed under: CNN Profiles • Culture • Entertainment • Voices
April 5th, 2013
10:12 AM ET

Historian: marriage ain't what it used to be

By Emma Lacey-Bordeaux, CNN

Follow on Twitter: @CNNEmma

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) - When the Supreme Court took up the issue of same sex marriage last week, one phrase seemed to be quite popular: "traditional marriage." Two of the Justices spoke about the long history of traditional marriage. For examples, Justice Samuel Alito said:

[0:15] "Traditional marriage has been around for thousands of years,  same sex marriage is very new."

It's true that people have wed for centuries but many historians say the kind of marriage recognized by the U.S. government today is not the same as the kind that existed 200 years ago.

Dr. Elizabeth Pleck of the University of Illinois has studied the topic:

[1:05] "Traditional marriage once included the idea of the covered legal status of married women. That is that the husband and the wife were one and the 'one' was the husband."

That concept began to change when the government granted women more rights. First came rights to own property, followed by  the right to vote. Both of which are often taken for granted today. At the time though, Dr. Pleck says opponents voiced concerns about how these changes would impact marriage.

Throughout American history marriage has changed in other ways. Notably the 1967 Supreme Court ruling which invalidated laws against miscegenation, or mixing of races. Now around 10 percent of American marriages are interracial.

In an amicus brief submitted in support of the respondents in the DOMA case heard last week, Dr. Pleck and a couple dozen other historians spelled out other changes.

Still, Dr. Pleck says she understands why people worry about changes to marriage. After all, she says, the interest in regulating marriage stems from the belief that marriage stabilizes society as a whole.

Still, she argues, that would not be meaningful to people today if it had not undergone changes in years, and centuries, past.

[3:26] "The institution of marriage is not the same now as it once was and the reason the institution of marriage is so meaningful to people is precisely because it keeps track with and keeps up to date with the times it's not an unchanging institution."

Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. And listen to CNN Soundwaves on our SoundCloud page.

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Filed under: Stories • Voices
April 5th, 2013
09:32 AM ET

The Gitmo guard who converted to Islam

By Jim Roope, CNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) - Army Specialist Terry Holdbrooks was a member of the 463rd Military Police Company when he came to the U.S. detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in 2003.  He was an angry, nearly atheistic 19-year-old military police guard. Nearly a year later, he left a changed man and a Muslim.

[0:18] “One of the things that kind of amazed me about Guantanamo was that the detainees could wake up each day and smile.”

Holdbrooks thought, how can these men, who have no freedom, no rights, not only tell each other jokes and keep each other’s spirits up but still believe in and pray to God?

[1:57] “Obviously there’s something more to Islam than what I’ve been told which was nothing.”

Against the rules, Holdbrooks began to have discussions with the detainees. He became particularly close to one detainee, a Moroccan man named Ahmed Errachidi. It was this relationship that started Holdbrooks' journey of religious conversion.

Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. And listen to CNN Soundwaves on our SoundCloud page.

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Filed under: Faith • Soundwaves • Stories
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