.
CNN Radio News Day: April 23, 2013
The mother of the suspected Boston bombers talks on the phone and later on the street with CNN's Nick Paton Walsh.
April 23rd, 2013
04:55 PM ET

CNN Radio News Day: April 23, 2013

CNN Radio News Day is an evening news program providing an informative, thoughtful and creative look at the day's events. It's posted Monday through Friday at 4:30 pm ET.

You don’t have to be at this blog to listen, we want you to take us with you! Click the download button in the SoundCloud player and put us on your smart phone or tablet and bring us with you in the car, on the train or while you’re working out.

(CNN) – Welcome to CNN Radio News Day.

  • The surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings, Dzhokhar Tzarnaev, was shot in the throat and is still in the hospital. Earlier today he was upgraded from serious to fair condition. He still can't talk, but he has been able to communicate with authorities by writing and nodding his head. He's indicated that his older brother, Tamerlan, was the mastermind of the terror plot. Dzhokhar says part of  his brother's motivation came from his belief that Islam is under attack and needed to be defended.

The terror suspects' mother, however, is adamant that her sons had nothing to do with the bombings. CNN's Nick Paton Walsh is covering the story from the Russian Republic of Dagestan. He was able to talk to the mother on the phone yesterday:

"When I spoke to her in the late evening she was pretty much sure that this was a case of mistaken identity, and it was not Tamerlan, her eldest son who the FBI had shot dead. But as the evening drew on, she saw pictures online, social media, and recognized the dead body, deeply traumatic for her, of course – struggling I think, to absorb the enormity of the charges leveled against both of her sons..." FULL POST

Posted by
Filed under: News Day • Soundwaves
Still identifying 9/11 victims' remains
Paulette Hasson wears a photo of her son, Joseph who died on 9/11.
April 23rd, 2013
10:26 AM ET

Still identifying 9/11 victims' remains

By Steve Kastenbaum, CNN

Follow on Twitter: @SKastenbaumCNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) – It's been over 12 years since more than 2,700 people died at the World Trade Center in New York.

The families of about 60 percent of those victims had some human remains returned to them. Often, it was nothing more than a small bone fragment identified through DNA testing. Those still waiting are hoping that a new pile of construction debris will contain the match they still wait for.

[2:32] "It'll be difficult. All the emotions, all the thoughts come rushing back to you. It would be a relief to know that these sacred remains are no longer sitting in a landfill somewhere," said Michael Burke who lost his brother, Fire Department Captain William Burke, Jr.

FULL POST

Loss of legs, not life
Jason Fowler, pictured here, won the handcycle division of the 2009 Ironman World Championship in Hawaii.
April 23rd, 2013
09:11 AM ET

Loss of legs, not life

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

By Jonathan Binder, CNN

Follow on Twitter: @jbinder

(CNN) – The first suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings is dead. The second has been caught and now faces a trial. But the wounds from that horrific day have not healed. More than a dozen victims had one or both legs amputated. Their lives forever changed.

In many ways, Boston's own Jason Fowler knows what that's like. He did race this year's marathon, but not by running. Instead, he was in a wheelchair.

In 1991, Fowler lost the use of his legs when he was 17 following a motocross accident while getting ready for his first professional season. Although his motocross career ended that day, it would turn out to be only a minor speed bump in his racing career.

Fowler would eventually become an Ironman champion in 2009, but that came after a long road of recovery and adjusting to a new way of life.

He shares his story and encouragement for those injured in the Boston Marathon bombing:

[5:20] "I know my injury is very different in the way that it happened with a motorcycle and really being my own fault. But I would say that it's similar in that you have to move on. One of the toughest things is taking that first step, and that's going to be really scary. It's going to be really scary to  learn to live with and come to terms with what other people would call a disability. I would tend to call it an 'ability' because it's going to enhance other senses and give you a quality of life that is very different. "

Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. And listen to CNN Soundwaves on our SoundCloud page.

Posted by
Filed under: Soundwaves • Stories • Voices