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CNN Radio News Day: May 31, 2013
A Syrian army tank fires during a battle against opposition fighters in the city of Qusayr, in Syria's central Homs province, on May 23, 2013.
May 31st, 2013
04:40 PM ET

CNN Radio News Day: May 31, 2013

CNN Radio News Day is an evening news program providing an informative, thoughtful and creative look at the day's events. It's posted Monday through Friday at 4:30 pm ET.

You don’t have to be at this blog to listen, we want you to take us with you! Click the download button in the SoundCloud player and put us on your smart phone or tablet and bring us with you in the car, on the train or while you’re working out.

(CNN) – Welcome to CNN Radio News Day. Here are some of the stories we're covering in today's show:

  • Syria's complicated and bloody civil war has now become more complicated.  That's because of Hezbollah's recent alignment with the forces of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. Hezbollah has been dubbed a terrorist group by the United States and other western countries. In an interview, al-Assad switched gears :

"Arabs have forgotten the real enemy is Israel, and engage themselves in fighting amongst themselves. We remind Arab nations through their achievements and victories, that our enemy remains in the same place." FULL POST

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Introducing Wendy Williams
TV personality Wendy Williams attends the 23rd Annual GLAAD Media Awards at the Marriott Marquis Hotel on March 24, 2012 in New York City.
May 31st, 2013
12:22 PM ET

Introducing Wendy Williams

Hosted by Michael Schulder

Follow Michael at: www.wavemaker.me

Editor's Note: Listen to the full interview in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) – I think I hit the jackpot when I sat down with Wendy Williams for this CNN Profile.

She may be Exhibit A in the case I’ve been building since I turned 50 to destroy the myth of the 18-49 demographic.

The “demo” is the age group that advertisers having been paying top dollar for on network television for the past half century or so. In fact, some advertisers won’t pay for any audience members outside that demo.

If any advertiser or network executive would like to inform Wendy Williams she will soon be kicked out of your target “demo,” please leave your name and job title in the comments section below. We’d like to hear from you. FULL POST

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Filed under: CNN Profiles • Culture • Media • Profiles • Voices
CNN Radio News Day: May 30, 2013
Anthony Weiner listens to a question from the media after courting voters outside a Harlem subway station a day after announcing he will enter the New York mayoral race on May 23, 2013 in New York City.
May 30th, 2013
04:31 PM ET

CNN Radio News Day: May 30, 2013

CNN Radio News Day is an evening news program providing an informative, thoughtful and creative look at the day's events. It's posted Monday through Friday at 4:30 pm ET.

You don’t have to be at this blog to listen, we want you to take us with you! Click the download button in the SoundCloud player and put us on your smart phone or tablet and bring us with you in the car, on the train or while you’re working out.

(CNN) – Welcome to CNN Radio News Day. Here are some of the stories we're covering in today's show:

  • Scandal. It's a word that's been used a lot lately, especially with swirling Washington D.C. controversies over the Benghazi consulate attack, the IRS, and the Justice Department. A new poll shows those 'scandals' have dragged down President Obama's popularity. But there's a case to be made that for other politicians, scandals can have an effect you wouldn't expect. Two years ago New York Democratic congressman Anthony Weiner stepped-down in shame amid a self-made scandal. Now he's back, and CNN's Steve Kastenbaum says he's getting good poll numbers in his bid to become mayor of New York City:

"A recent poll from the Marist Institute of Public Opinion showed that 53% of voters in New York feel Weiner deserves a second chance." FULL POST

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Voters forgive despite sex scandals
May 30th, 2013
04:26 PM ET

Voters forgive despite sex scandals

By Steve Kastenbaum, CNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) – Two years ago, then Democratic Representative Anthony Weiner walked into a hotel ballroom in New York packed with reporters and admitted that he sent lewd photos to women he met online.

Now, he’s asking for a second chance as he runs for mayor of New York City. Every day on the campaign trail he finds himself apologizing, like he did at a recent mayoral candidate forum in the Bronx:

[4:55] “I’m sorry. You put a great deal of hope and confidence in me and I did some very embarrassing things and I regret them.”

A few weeks ago, former South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford won redemption in a special congressional election despite having run off with his Argentinian mistress for a week.

Kay Hymowitz is with the Manhattan Institute, a public policy think tank in New York and has written about these issues:

[2:53] “I think people are willing to forgive if they feel there’s been a real change and if they don’t have other choices that they’re not happy with and that seems the be the case here,” said Hymowitz.

But being given a second chance and actually getting people to vote for you are two different things.

Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. And listen to CNN Soundwaves on our SoundCloud page.

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Filed under: Behavior • Culture • Politics • Soundwaves • Stories
Terrorism or criminal act?
Notes and shirts sit outside Woolwich Barracks on May 23 – after a Muslim extremist killed an off-duty soldier who was wearing a "Help for Heroes" shirt when he was killed.
May 30th, 2013
09:03 AM ET

Terrorism or criminal act?

By Libby Lewis, CNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) - Remi Brulin loves tracking the way America thinks about and talks about terrorism. He’s been doing it for years. He’s a visiting scholar at NYU’s Journalism Institute.

[1:47] Most people sort of agree on what terrorism should be. There’s violence of course, or the threat of violence. There’s the political aspect of it – and then there’s the issue of the target. Most people would agree the targets have to be civilians or non-combatants. There is a sort of agreement – until you start applying it to particular cases.

Then, Brulin says, all bets are off.

One reason is, no one can quite agree on a definition. A corollary of that is: it’s hard to keep politics out of it.

Bruce Hoffman, a terrorism expert who’s director of Georgetown University’s Center for Security Studies, remembers following the media coverage when Chechen terrorists laid siege to a school in Russia in 2004.

[3:34] All of the newspapers went out of their way to avoid using the word ‘terrorists’ and to call them fighters, militants, separatists. And I thought to myself, Gosh, if a bunch of armed people taking over a school with children – forcing children and their parents and their relatives and their teachers to live in horrible conditions for days on end, threatening them with death – I mean, if that’s not terrorism, what is? And yet, almost no newspaper of record or major media would call them terrorists.

That’s because the Chechens were fighting Russia – and at the time, Russia was no friend of the U.S.

Now, Hoffman says, terrorism has become a subjective term. He thinks there’s almost a fear of using the word and triggering a reaction – that’s a legacy of the 9-11 terrorist attacks.

Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. And listen to CNN Soundwaves on our SoundCloud page.

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Filed under: Crime • International • Justice • Politics • Soundwaves • Stories
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