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Illegal immigrants should apologize says priest
Father Gary Graf of Chicago's Saint Gall Catholic Church wants illegal immigrant to aplogize to Americans.
May 4th, 2013
07:00 AM ET

Illegal immigrants should apologize says priest

By Nova Safo, CNN

Follow on Twitter: @Nova_Safo

Chicago, Illinois (CNN) - A Chicago priest is making headlines for having done something that likely no other American has experienced: he crossed into Mexico – and then crossed back into the U.S. illegally. He says he did it to understand what many in his mostly Latino congregation have gone through. And he has a message for them: apologize if you’ve come here illegally.

Father Gary Graf of Chicago’s Saint Gall Catholic church on the city's south side serves a predominantly Latino and immigrant part of town. He’s a charismatic figure, in his 50’s and in good shape. He used to be a boxer and he’s got a deep, dark tan. The tan is the result of his walk through the desert at the U-S-Mexico border, where he crossed back into the U-S illegally.

[1:25] “I’ve lived in Mexico, know language, culture. Lived among them here in the states. But have never experienced getting here the way they got here – the vast majority of them,” he says.

The experience, he says, has resulted in a simple message to illegal immigrants:

[4:40] “Sorry. Thank you. I need your help.” FULL POST

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Filed under: Behavior • Crime • Faith • International • Justice • Politics • Soundwaves • Stories
CNN Profiles: Faith in the messenger
Elie Wiesel claps as U.S. President Barack Obama speaks at the Holocaust Museum April 23, 2012 in Washington, DC.
April 29th, 2013
12:21 PM ET

CNN Profiles: Faith in the messenger

Hosted by Michael Schulder

Follow Michael at: www.wavemaker.me

Editor's Note: Today marks the 20th anniversary of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. It was Elie Wiesel’s idea to make this an institution of learning rather than a simple memorial. Michael Schulder, host of the CNN Profiles, sat down with Professor Wiesel to talk about a range of issues, including how a sense of humor survives in so many survivors. This story, though, is about faith.

Listen to the full interview in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) - “They called him Moishe the Beadle, as if his entire life he had never had a surname.”

This is the opening line of the most widely read memoir of the Holocaust, "Night," by Elie Wiesel.

I had the opportunity to ask Professor Wiesel about Moishe the Beadle the other day when we sat down for an in-depth CNN Profile, which you can listen to here. FULL POST

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Filed under: Behavior • CNN Profiles • Culture • History • Voices
April 26th, 2013
11:22 AM ET

CNN Profiles: After Boston, you will dance again

Hosted by Michael Schulder

Follow Michael at: www.wavemaker.me

Editor's Note: Listen to the full interview in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) - Dr. Sanjay Gupta was talking about the signature injury of the Boston Massacre last night on CNN: the limb wounds that have led to amputations.

He explained how some survivors still face a choice in the coming days and weeks over whether to try to save a limb, or let it go forever.

It can be, Dr. Gupta said, a choice between form and function.

There are actually some cases where one can survive with a badly damaged leg but would actually increase their mobility and the functionality of that leg by having it amputated and replacing it with a high quality prosthesis (many of which are not, by the way, covered by insurance.)

Form or function?

Our guest on this edition of CNN Profiles had to make such a choice.

His name is Dr. Jeff Cain. He is chief of family medicine at Denver Children's Hospital. FULL POST

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Filed under: Behavior • CNN Profiles • Health • Voices
Living with Grandma and making it work
Peggy Casey and her mother Marguerite Stentz at their home in suburban Atlanta.
April 22nd, 2013
09:09 AM ET

Living with Grandma and making it work

By Emma Lacey-Bordeaux, CNN

Follow on Twitter: @CNNEmma

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

Three years ago Peggy Casey found herself in a situation that's increasingly common in the United States. She needed to sort out elder care for her mother. So Casey went hunting for options. She found an assisted living home that she thought would do nicely.

[:46] "My idea was I'll pluck her out of this home that has all these problems and I'll put her down in this gorgeous place full of luxury and of course she didn't see it that way at all."

That's putting it mildly. Maguerite Stentz laughs at the memory:

[:57] " I would have hated it. I would have had my own little apartment upstairs and I'm not a people person. It would have been unbearable."

FULL POST

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Filed under: Behavior • Stories
After Boston, runners regroup and recommit
iReporter Jessica Pilkington posted a photo of her shoes to signify her commitment to running in response to the Boston terror attack.
April 19th, 2013
04:03 PM ET

After Boston, runners regroup and recommit

By Emma Lacey-Bordeaux, CNN

Follow on Twitter: @CNNEmma

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) - David Sarich had long finished the Boston Marathon when the bombs went off:

[:20] "I finished about 1:20. I got my clothes, got my partner, went in search of free beer. It was about 2:50 when I heard a big boom."

He's now back home in Atlanta. He's safe but the experience has left him shaken. He says at the time the bombs went off, most of the runners on the course were those running for a charity or for a family member:

[1:07] "Those are the people I usually run with. That I usually train with. I was just lucky to be further along."

FULL POST

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Filed under: Behavior • Stories
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