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Big banks, big pharma and now, big travel?
A child hams it up at Ankor Wat in Cambodia. The ruins attract millions of tourists every year.
June 20th, 2013
08:51 AM ET

Big banks, big pharma and now, big travel?

By Emma Lacey-Bordeaux, CNN

Follow on Twitter: @CNNEmma

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) - Elizabeth Becker's latest book was in part, born out of frustration. The seasoned journalist, who got her start as a war correspondent, began to notice a growing global economic force; a sector of the global economy changing whole societies and ecosystems but one relegated to the lifestyle section of most major papers.

So she decided to write a book about it and give it the attention it deserves:

[1:19] "My new book is Overbooked: The Exploding Business of Travel and Tourism," she says.

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Filed under: International • Soundwaves • Stories
Diplomatic trafficking: the story that won’t go away
Dema Ramos, a Filipina woman allegedly trafficked by Kuwaiti diplomat assigned to the U.N. looks at family photos.
June 19th, 2013
06:00 AM ET

Diplomatic trafficking: the story that won’t go away

By Libby Lewis, CNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) – The story of diplomats bringing domestic workers to the United States and treating them like slaves is not new, but it keeps coming back.

It keeps coming back because diplomats believe they have life-long immunity from prosecution – even when they break the law.

Just last month, immigration agents helped two Filipina women escape a house rented by high-ranking members of the Saudi military just outside Washington DC. The women said their Saudi employer held them captive and abused them.

FULL POST

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Filed under: Crime • International • Justice • Soundwaves • Stories
The data insiders who 'hold the keys'
June 11th, 2013
10:42 AM ET

The data insiders who 'hold the keys'

By Libby Lewis, CNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) –  You may know that Edward Snowden was a system administrator for the NSA contractor he worked for – Booz Allen Hamilton.

You may even know that system administrators are responsible for nearly a third of the data breaches committed by insiders, because, as computer security expert Robert Richardson puts it, “they hold the keys.”

But here’s one thing you might not know: Snowden didn’t need the authority and access that he had to do his job.

FULL POST

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Filed under: Crime • International • Justice • Politics • Soundwaves • Stories • Technology
Chinese living in US look forward to Presidential visit
Chinese Ex-Pats in LA say Xi Jinping's visit to California is positive for both countries.
June 7th, 2013
10:46 AM ET

Chinese living in US look forward to Presidential visit

By Jim Roope, CNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) - Chinese President Xi Jinping will visit with President Obama in Southern California this weekend.

Chinese ex-patriots living in Los Angeles say the historic visit is good for both countries.

[1:04] “The two countries; the relationship more better. That is my wish.

Seventy-six-year-old Kit came to the US from China in the 1940s. He says he hopes the visit results in mutual respect between the two countries.

FULL POST

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Filed under: Culture • International • Politics • Soundwaves • Stories
Freedom of the press
A police officer stops to look at flowers laid close to the scene where Drummer Lee Rigby of the 2nd Battalion the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers was killed in May.
June 6th, 2013
02:26 PM ET

Freedom of the press

By Libby Lewis, CNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) – The divide between the U.S. and the U.K. over press coverage of crimes is about as wide as the Atlantic.

Cases in point: George Zimmerman, who’s accused of shooting Trayvon Martin last year in Florida – and the cases of Michael Adebolajo and Michael Adebowale, the two Muslim converts who are accused of butchering to death British soldier Lee Rigby in South London last month.

Zimmerman’s lawyer has used the courts – and the Fourth Amendment – to try to reshape the image of Trayvon Martin, says defense attorney Ron Kuby. He’s done it by getting the press to cover his requests to enter evidence that would link Martin, in the jury’s mind, with the idea of guns, and marijuana and violence.

[:44] “O’Mara’s purpose in releasing all this information he knows can’t come into evidence is to dirty up Trayvon Martin….to portray him in the minds of the jurors as a vaguely menacing young black man,” Kuby told CNN

In other words, O’Mara’s using the court – and the press – “trying to eliminate that image of a totally innocent teenage boy armed with Skittles and iced tea.” FULL POST

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Filed under: Crime • International • Justice • Media • Soundwaves • Stories
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