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Diplomatic trafficking: the story that won’t go away
Dema Ramos, a Filipina woman allegedly trafficked by Kuwaiti diplomat assigned to the U.N. looks at family photos.
June 19th, 2013
06:00 AM ET

Diplomatic trafficking: the story that won’t go away

By Libby Lewis, CNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) – The story of diplomats bringing domestic workers to the United States and treating them like slaves is not new, but it keeps coming back.

It keeps coming back because diplomats believe they have life-long immunity from prosecution – even when they break the law.

Just last month, immigration agents helped two Filipina women escape a house rented by high-ranking members of the Saudi military just outside Washington DC. The women said their Saudi employer held them captive and abused them.

FULL POST

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Filed under: Crime • International • Justice • Soundwaves • Stories
CNN Profiles: Who's guarding the guardians?
The National Security Agency may be the focus of controversy about privacy and data-mining, but the issues don't just involve the federal government.
June 14th, 2013
09:59 AM ET

CNN Profiles: Who's guarding the guardians?

Hosted by Michael Schulder

Follow Michael at: www.wavemaker.me

Editor's Note: Listen to the full interview in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) - Do you remember when Google predicted the spread of the H1N1 flu throughout the U.S. more accurately and more quickly than the Centers for Disease Control did? Neither did I, until I started reading the new book, "Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work and Think."

“Like the CDC,” write the authors, “they could tell where the flu had spread, but unlike the CDC they could tell it in near real time, not a week or two after the fact.”

Now that we have a great example of how much good internet giants can do – monitoring and storing our every click, our every phone call – we can get to the issue of the day: the leaks by a young computer analyst named Edward Snowden that revealed the U.S. government’s National Security Agency was gathering and storing far more of our online behavior and cell phone calls than we ever imagined. FULL POST

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Filed under: CNN Profiles • Culture • Justice • Media • Politics • Profiles • Technology • Voices
Texas law: kill an escort with no penalty
Texas Gov. Rick Perry fires a six-shooter pistol. Following a recent acquittal in a murder case, a Texas law on use of deadly force is under scrutiny.
June 12th, 2013
11:46 AM ET

Texas law: kill an escort with no penalty

By Tommy Andres, CNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) –In Florida jury selection continues in the murder case of Trayvon Martin. The case has drawn national attention for its elements of  race and the question over when deadly force is justified.

A thousand miles west of Sanford, Florida in San Antonio, Texas, a case has just concluded with similar questions about the use of deadly force. James Moore wrote about the case for CNN Opinion:

[6:33] "I don't quite understand why the national media hasn't discovered it in a greater way, this case is every bit as horrific and every bit as tragic."

FULL POST

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Filed under: Crime • Justice • Media • Soundwaves • Stories
The data insiders who 'hold the keys'
June 11th, 2013
10:42 AM ET

The data insiders who 'hold the keys'

By Libby Lewis, CNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) –  You may know that Edward Snowden was a system administrator for the NSA contractor he worked for – Booz Allen Hamilton.

You may even know that system administrators are responsible for nearly a third of the data breaches committed by insiders, because, as computer security expert Robert Richardson puts it, “they hold the keys.”

But here’s one thing you might not know: Snowden didn’t need the authority and access that he had to do his job.

FULL POST

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Filed under: Crime • International • Justice • Politics • Soundwaves • Stories • Technology
Freedom of the press
A police officer stops to look at flowers laid close to the scene where Drummer Lee Rigby of the 2nd Battalion the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers was killed in May.
June 6th, 2013
02:26 PM ET

Freedom of the press

By Libby Lewis, CNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) - The divide between the U.S. and the U.K. over press coverage of crimes is about as wide as the Atlantic.

Cases in point: George Zimmerman, who’s accused of shooting Trayvon Martin last year in Florida – and the cases of Michael Adebolajo and Michael Adebowale, the two Muslim converts who are accused of butchering to death British soldier Lee Rigby in South London last month.

Zimmerman’s lawyer has used the courts – and the Fourth Amendment – to try to reshape the image of Trayvon Martin, says defense attorney Ron Kuby. He’s done it by getting the press to cover his requests to enter evidence that would link Martin, in the jury’s mind, with the idea of guns, and marijuana and violence.

[:44] “O’Mara’s purpose in releasing all this information he knows can’t come into evidence is to dirty up Trayvon Martin….to portray him in the minds of the jurors as a vaguely menacing young black man,” Kuby told CNN

In other words, O’Mara’s using the court – and the press – “trying to eliminate that image of a totally innocent teenage boy armed with Skittles and iced tea.” FULL POST

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