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Why Pandora turns to old school radio
Pandora has bought South Dakota radio station KXMZ-FM in an attempt to lower its fees.
June 18th, 2013
03:42 PM ET

Why Pandora turns to old school radio

By Jonathan Binder, CNN

Follow on Twitter: @jbinder

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) – Pandora Radio is a pioneer in putting music online. Pandora allows people to pull up endless music on their computers and take it on the go with a smart phone.

So why are they investing in a small South Dakota radio?

The internet radio giant claims it is paying too much in music licensing fees from companies like ASCAP and BMI. Not only did Pandora file suite against ASCAP, the company bought KXMZ in South Dakota because of a loophole. Companies with terrestrial radio pay less in licensing fees.

Glenn Peoples, Senior Editorial analyst at Billboard magazine, helps sum up their case:

[1:03] "Pandora's argument is that is that they shouldn't be penalized just because they are a stand alone internet radio service. They want the ASCAP fees that are available to stations that are a part of this radio music license  committee settlement."

Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. And listen to CNN Soundwaves on our SoundCloud page.

 

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Filed under: Media • Soundwaves • Stories • Technology
Your morning news, explained
June 17th, 2013
11:09 AM ET

Your morning news, explained

By Steve Kastenbaum, CNN

Follow on Twitter: @SKastenbaumCNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) – Do you start your day off by switching on the TV?

If you watch even just a few minutes of ABC’s Good Morning America, CBS’s This Morning or NBC’s The Today Show, you are among more than 13 million Americans who tune in, according to a 2012 study from the Pew Research Center on people’s viewing habits.

FULL POST

CNN Profiles: Who's guarding the guardians?
The National Security Agency may be the focus of controversy about privacy and data-mining, but the issues don't just involve the federal government.
June 14th, 2013
09:59 AM ET

CNN Profiles: Who's guarding the guardians?

Hosted by Michael Schulder

Follow Michael at: www.wavemaker.me

Editor's Note: Listen to the full interview in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) - Do you remember when Google predicted the spread of the H1N1 flu throughout the U.S. more accurately and more quickly than the Centers for Disease Control did? Neither did I, until I started reading the new book, "Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work and Think."

“Like the CDC,” write the authors, “they could tell where the flu had spread, but unlike the CDC they could tell it in near real time, not a week or two after the fact.”

Now that we have a great example of how much good internet giants can do – monitoring and storing our every click, our every phone call – we can get to the issue of the day: the leaks by a young computer analyst named Edward Snowden that revealed the U.S. government’s National Security Agency was gathering and storing far more of our online behavior and cell phone calls than we ever imagined. FULL POST

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Filed under: CNN Profiles • Culture • Justice • Media • Politics • Profiles • Technology • Voices
Texas law: kill an escort with no penalty
Texas Gov. Rick Perry fires a six-shooter pistol. Following a recent acquittal in a murder case, a Texas law on use of deadly force is under scrutiny.
June 12th, 2013
11:46 AM ET

Texas law: kill an escort with no penalty

By Tommy Andres, CNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) –In Florida jury selection continues in the murder case of Trayvon Martin. The case has drawn national attention for its elements of  race and the question over when deadly force is justified.

A thousand miles west of Sanford, Florida in San Antonio, Texas, a case has just concluded with similar questions about the use of deadly force. James Moore wrote about the case for CNN Opinion:

[6:33] "I don't quite understand why the national media hasn't discovered it in a greater way, this case is every bit as horrific and every bit as tragic."

FULL POST

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Filed under: Crime • Justice • Media • Soundwaves • Stories
Geoffrey Fletcher's f-stop magic
"Precious" screenwriter, Geofrey Fletcher. His new film, "Violet and Daisy," follows two teenage girl assassins whose violent work takes an unexpected turn.
June 7th, 2013
01:45 PM ET

Geoffrey Fletcher's f-stop magic

Hosted by Michael Schulder

Follow Michael at: www.wavemaker.me

Editor's Note: Listen to the full interview in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) - Dear Fellow Parents:

When Geoffrey Fletcher was about 13 years old his father sat down beside him to teach him about F-stops on a camera. F-stops help determine how much light gets through the lens.

That moment, of a father sharing a hobby with his son, came back to Geoffrey Fletcher during this CNN Profile and moved him, as it will most anyone who hears him recount it.

Fletcher’s dad died when Geoffrey was only 19. But a deep foundation of a secure, loving household for Geoffrey and his two brothers was well established.

That foundation must have helped Fletcher get through what was to come after he graduated from film school. FULL POST

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Filed under: CNN Profiles • Culture • Entertainment • Media • Profiles • Voices
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