.
Wisdom on ice
June 21st, 2013
01:21 PM ET

Wisdom on ice

Hosted by Michael Schulder

Follow Michael at: www.wavemaker.me

Editor's Note: Listen to the full interview in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) - When it comes to hockey, my brain is like an ice rink that has just been cleared by a Zamboni.

I don't have a single groove of knowledge.

Just a big smooth slippery surface.

I'm tired of living this way.

The tipping point came the other night when my 9-year-old daughter and I were channel surfing and stumbled upon the game 3 sudden death overtime of the Stanley Cup Finals.

FULL POST

Posted by ,
Filed under: CNN Profiles • Sports • Voices
A message of fitness from on high
James Mills of Expedition Denali, the first team of black climbers to attempt to reach the summit of Alaska's Mount McKinley.
June 19th, 2013
05:59 PM ET

A message of fitness from on high

By Edgar Treiguts, CNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) – Right now, there's a group of people tackling the highest mountain in North America – Mount McKinley in Alaska, also known as Mount Denali.

Expedition Denali is made-up of nine members, ranging in age from 18-56, coming from varied professional and career backgrounds. A week and a half into their climb, the group is set to hit the summit very soon. One other note about the group – all of its members are African-American. The team is attempting to become the first group of black men and women to stand atop North America's highest mountain - 20,156 feet high

The makeup of the expedition was by design. It was organized by the National Outdoor Leadership School, with an aim to stir young people, in particuar minorities, to see the value of outdoor recreation and preservtion. James Mills is part of the effort, an African-American who's been an avid outdoor athlete most of his life:

           [1:36] "Our goal is to let people of color, especially young people, know that it's cool to spend time outdoors in nature. It's fun to spend time outdoors in nature."

James Mills is also a freelance journalist. The climb is for his effort The Joy Trip Project, and he's documenting it for National Geographic.

Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. And listen to CNN Soundwaves on our SoundCloud page.

Posted by
Filed under: Culture • Health • Nature • Soundwaves • Sports
Why do athletes dope?
June 8th, 2013
10:40 AM ET

Why do athletes dope?

By Steve Kastenbaum, CNN

Follow on Twitter: @SkastenbaumCNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) – Over the last decade, more than a few professional baseball players have had their reputations, and legacies, tarnished by doping. That doesn’t seem to have deterred some big leaguers from taking that same risk today.

Earlier this week, reports surfaced that 20 Major League Baseball players face suspensions of up to 100 games for using banned substances.

[1:21] “This is how professional sports work,” says CJ Nitkowski, a pitcher for several different major league teams from 1996 to 2005. “Guys will still cheat. And when there’s so much at stake. I mean you look at and talk about the dollars that are at stake and the difference between a guy who is in Triple A and the major leagues is not that much. So guys are always trying to gain an edge.”

FULL POST

Would you pay for pain?
A car accident at age 16 left Michael Mills (left) paralyzed from the waist down. But he joined dozens of other men and women from all walks of life for the Go Ruck Challenge in Atlanta in late May.
June 7th, 2013
05:00 PM ET

Would you pay for pain?

By Tommy Andres, CNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

Atlanta, Georgia (CNN) – A lot of people that show up at a bar at one in the morning are probably wrapping up an evening of drinks with friends or a date that's gone well enough to last that long.

But if you were one of the several dozen folks who rolled into The Independent in Midtown Atlanta on the Friday before Memorial Day, your night was just getting started, and drinks were not on the menu.

These brave (or crazy) men and women had paid nearly $100 bucks to stay up all night and do some of the most grueling manual labor of their lives. Oh, and they would be yelled at the whole time. This is Go Ruck.

There are tons of obstacle races out there, but Go Ruck is not a race. There are no winners. In fact, you're punished if you surpass your team.

Go Ruck is U.S. Army Special Forces training for the everyman. It's push-ups and crabwalks, swimming and simulated operations. And all of it is done wearing a backpack stuffed with 55 pounds of weights.

In fact, that backpack is what started it all. It's called the GR-1 and it was created by a former Green Beret turned entrepreneur named Jason McCarthy. He says it was inspired by the ones he used in combat:

[1:23] "Here we had this bag, right? And we spent a lot of time on it. A couple years. But yet no one wanted to buy it."

Inspired by the exploding trend of obstacle races and the sense of teamwork he felt from his service, he started Go Ruck as essentially a marketing campaign for the backpacks. And it exploded. Since the first Go Ruck challenge in 2010 more than 12,000 people have participated in countries across the world.

So why do people pay for pain? Jason says it's all about learning that you're stronger than you think.

[6:37] "I think that when you show people what they're capable of, I think it's kind of like a drug. You see the world in a different place and you say this isn't that hard. Other stuff that you're doing, it's not that hard. And this is true of life as well. So, the popularity is just based on people seeing a better side of themselves and humanity."

Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. And listen to CNN Soundwaves on our SoundCloud page.


Filed under: Behavior • Health • Soundwaves • Sports • Stories
Derby's forgotten history rekindled
Jimmy Winkfield, the last black jockey to win the Kentucky Derby, atop his horse in Chicago, 1901.
May 3rd, 2013
05:33 PM ET

Derby's forgotten history rekindled

By Edgar Treiguts, CNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) -  Saturday afternoon, 21 horses will go to post at the famed Churchill Downs in Louisville.

Atop those horses will be their jockeys, looking to ride them to victory in the sport's crown jewel – the Kentucky Derby. But the appearance of one of those riders will shake back to life a largely forgotten time in horse racing's history when African-American jockeys dominated.

Kevin Krigger could become the first black jockey to win the Derby since 1902. He understands the historic significance, but also wants to win to validate his talent:

[4:02] "It's everything that I want to say that I stand for if I get to win the Kentucky Derby...and that is a major goal of mine."

Krigger is the second African-American jockey to compete in the Kentucky Derby since 1921.

Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. And listen to CNN Soundwaves on our SoundCloud page.

Posted by
Filed under: Culture • History • Soundwaves • Sports • Stories
« older posts
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 118 other followers