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Mayor Bloomberg to NYers: Compost your food scraps!
The Brooklyn Botanic Garden's Jenny Blackwell turns nutrient-rich compost.
June 18th, 2013
11:08 AM ET

Mayor Bloomberg to NYers: Compost your food scraps!

By Steve Kastenbaum, CNN

Follow on Twitter: @SKastenbaumCNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) – First he forced chain restaurants to post calorie counts on their menus. Then he pushed forward with a ban on large size sugary soft drinks.

Now New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg wants people to set aside their food scraps so they can be collected for composting.

"It gives people a way to participate in composting even if you don't want to go whole hog yourself," said Brooklyn Botanic Garden spokesperson Kate Blumm. "So you don't want worms under your sink? Fine. You don't want to have to go out to your backyard with a pitchfork once a week? Fine. This is a way that you can participate, or really I can participate, as well."

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Your morning news, explained
June 17th, 2013
11:09 AM ET

Your morning news, explained

By Steve Kastenbaum, CNN

Follow on Twitter: @SKastenbaumCNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) – Do you start your day off by switching on the TV?

If you watch even just a few minutes of ABC’s Good Morning America, CBS’s This Morning or NBC’s The Today Show, you are among more than 13 million Americans who tune in, according to a 2012 study from the Pew Research Center on people’s viewing habits.

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Inside immigration's war rooms
Maricela Aguilar leads a United We Dream meeting in the room where the group tracks members of Congress by post-it notes.
June 13th, 2013
10:03 AM ET

Inside immigration's war rooms

By Lisa Desjardins, CNN

Follow on Twitter: @LisaDCNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) – The U.S. Senate has officially begun the debate on immigration reform. However, it is only the last, and perhaps least, vocal step in what is a largely unseen and incredibly massive push and pull immigration from outside the Capitol.

[:43] "I think we should have a massive tweet attack on (Senator) Rubio," 22-year-old Maricela Aguilar suggested to her fellow staffers at United We Dream Wednesday.

The group is made of young Americans who were undocumented until President Obama created his Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program that grants temporary waivers to those who were brought into the country illegally as children.

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One leaker vs. a national debate
Graffiti focused on NSA leaker Edward Snowden sits on a sidewalk in San Francisco.
June 12th, 2013
11:06 AM ET

One leaker vs. a national debate

By Lisa Desjardins, CNN

Follow on Twitter: @LisaDCNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) – With rare exception, leakers don’t come forward voluntarily.

On Sunday though, when Edward Snowden and the Guardian revealed that he was the source behind the British newspaper’s bombshell stories about U.S. data collection, both the standard operating procedure and the way the public responds to these kinds of revelations may have changed.

In the Guardian interview, Snowden insisted he was going public so that Americans could hear and judge his motives for themselves and engage in a public debate over security versus privacy.

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Why do athletes dope?
June 8th, 2013
10:40 AM ET

Why do athletes dope?

By Steve Kastenbaum, CNN

Follow on Twitter: @SkastenbaumCNN

Editor's Note: Listen to the full story in our player above, and join the conversation in our comments section below.

(CNN) – Over the last decade, more than a few professional baseball players have had their reputations, and legacies, tarnished by doping. That doesn’t seem to have deterred some big leaguers from taking that same risk today.

Earlier this week, reports surfaced that 20 Major League Baseball players face suspensions of up to 100 games for using banned substances.

[1:21] “This is how professional sports work,” says CJ Nitkowski, a pitcher for several different major league teams from 1996 to 2005. “Guys will still cheat. And when there’s so much at stake. I mean you look at and talk about the dollars that are at stake and the difference between a guy who is in Triple A and the major leagues is not that much. So guys are always trying to gain an edge.”

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